Frequently Asked Questions

Is buying art decorative or investment?

In the instance of investment art, anticipated return on investment normally dictates the type of art purchased.

If an immediate return (approximately 3-5yrs) is expected, then look out for names such as Pierneef, Maggie Laubster and the like. Needless to say that prices range from six to ten figures for an oil painting and are rare finds.

However if you’re not in a hurry investments can be found across the spectrum. We currently have pieces by ear marked old masters which cost about R15000 upwards and works by the old masters in various medium and sizes that cost a lot less than the famed pieces.

For a first time buyer, it is advisable to purchase a well known already established artist. This does not necessarily have to be their most expensive, largest work or even an oil painting, but rather a piece upon which you are guaranteed a return.

At a later stage when you have established your budget and availability, you may have to decide how you intend to break up you investment portfolio. Whether you will purchase one large painting or a series of smaller paintings?

Most people assume that decorative art cannot be an investment, but really each painting should fulfill both roles.

With decorative pieces, identifying where you intend to put the painting and thus the mood and feel you want will really help both you and the gallery find you a piece you like
Most first time/younger buyers tend to buy pieces they really like, thus leaning more towards contemporary pieces. These however can also be investments because within each given medium are artists’ ear marked for Old Master status. Thus purchasing such pieces maybe more worthwhile in the long run.

How do we determine the value of art works?

The most common question I get from potential art buyers is why a tiny painting of a vase of flowers (a flower study) costs more than this let say a harbor scene with the ocean and boats etc. So let me take this time to introduce you to the foundational principal’s of art.

In most instances, the price of a painting is influenced by a series of factors:

  1. The medium used with oil paintings being most expensive.
  2. What the painting is painted on (oil on canvas again being the most expensive and durable)
  3. The size of the painting with larger paintings costing more
  4. The subject matter portrayed (this does not refer to how busy the content of the painting is but rather, how well that subject is executed)
  5. How well known the artist is/was? (This is not about personal popularity but exhibitions, auctions and recognition by major institutions.
  6. Deceased artists  (Old Masters) tend to cost more because supply is limited whereas demand is not.

How do galleries set prices of art?

A few years ago, galleries determined the price of art based on what artists wanted for their products and the gallery mark-up. However this is no longer the case, at least not always. It is now auction houses that determine the price of art. This is because auctions determine what the market is willing to pay for a particular name, medium, size etc.  Then working from the results of these auctions galleries are able to determine the average price range for given pieces plus or minus their own mark up and other pre-existing terms.

Is it decorative or investment?

In the instance of investment art, anticipated return on investment normally dictates the type of art purchased.

If an immediate return (approximately 3-5yrs) is expected, then look out for names such as Pierneef, Maggie Laubster and the like. Needless to say that prices range from six to ten figures for an oil painting and are rare finds.

However if you’re not in a hurry investments can be found across the spectrum. We currently have pieces by ear marked old masters which cost about R15000 upwards and works by the old masters in various medium and sizes that cost a lot less than the famed pieces.

For a first time buyer, it is advisable to purchase a well known already established artist. This does not necessarily have to be their most expensive, largest work or even an oil painting, but rather a piece upon which you are guaranteed a return.

At a later stage when you have established your budget and availability, you may have to decide how you intend to break up you investment portfolio. Whether you will purchase one large painting or a series of smaller paintings?

Most people assume that decorative art cannot be an investment, but really each painting should fulfill both roles.

With decorative pieces, identifying where you intend to put the painting and thus the mood and feel you want will really help both you and the gallery find you a piece you like.

Most first time/younger buyers tend to buy pieces they really like, thus leaning more towards contemporary pieces. These however can also be investments because within each given medium are artists’ ear marked for Old Master status. Thus purchasing such pieces maybe more worthwhile in the long run

"The way to use life is to do everything though being."
Lao

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7130